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Canada Pension Plan – Should You Take it Early?

New Rules governing the Canada Pension Plan took full effect in 2016.  Under these rules, the earliest you can take your CPP Pension is age 60, the latest is 70. The standard question regarding CPP remains the same – should I take it early or wait?

If you take it at the earliest age possible, age 60, your CPP income will be reduced by 0.6% each month you receive your benefit prior to age 65.  In other words, electing to take your CPP at age 60 will provide an income of 36% less than if you waited until age 65.

CPP benefits may also be delayed until age 70 so delaying your CPP benefits after age 65 will result in an increased income of 0.7% for each month of deferral.  As a result, at age 70, the retiree would have additional monthly income of 42% over that what he or she would have had at 65 and approximately 120% more than taking the benefit at age 60. The question now becomes, “how long do you think you will live?” Read more

Which Term Life Insurance is Right for You?

Once you have decided on how much life insurance you need, your next decision is whether you are going to use term insurance or permanent insurance to provide it.  For many Canadians, while permanent cash value life insurance offers a significant opportunity for them, many initially utilize renewable and convertible term life insurance.  Most life companies in Canada offer 10-year, 20-year and 30-year renewable term policies.   In deciding which one is right for you, attempt to match the need to the term.  While 10-year term might have the lowest entry level cost, the renewal premiums will be significantly higher.  If you have a young family, ask yourself, will I still need protection beyond the 10th year?  If that answer is yes, then a longer renewal period is more appropriate.

In making your choice, it is important to understand how renewable term policies function.  In Canada, the renewal of the coverage is automatic (unless you decide not to renew) and guaranteed.  The premium on renewal, however, will increase dramatically.  Anyone who has 10-year renewable term insurance, instead of renewing it, should re-write the policy for a new term period.  Read more

Prepare in Advance for Next Year’s Tax Filing

Phew! Tax season is over!  You have hopefully just filed your 2017 personal income tax returns.  Was it a satisfying experience for you?  Do you feel a sense of accomplishment or dismay?  For many, the April 30th deadline seems to arrive way too soon.  If this is the case with you, starting the process much earlier would seem to be the answer.

The process should include proper record keeping, taking advantage of the tax saving methods available to you, and, perhaps, finally getting a professional to complete and file your return on your behalf.  The problem with handing your taxes alone is that often people don’t know what they don’t know.  This results in paying more in taxes than was necessary.  The cost of a professional completing your taxes potentially could be offset by the savings that might be gained.

Even if you earned little to no income, filing your return is a good idea and could prove to be advantageous.  This is because there are a number of federal and provincial government programs that you might be eligible for if your declared income is below a certain threshold.  You can refer to the Government of Canada website for the child and family benefits that might be available to you. Read more

Six Important Reasons to have a Will

It has been said that a Will is the last message you will leave your family.  Having a Will can provide clear direction as to what your wishes are and who will get what.  Die without a Will (known as dying intestate) and chaos will likely be the result.  Having a Will allows you to provide for certainty instead of chaos.

Most of the reasons to have a Will have to do with what happens if you don’t have one and that often will depend on what province you reside in.  Each provincial government has its own Wills and Estate legislation which also provides for the rules regarding intestacy.  The following are some of the reasons to have a Will and what could result without one.

  1. Informs your family how and when your property is to be distributed

Your Will affords you the opportunity to give clear instructions as to whom will receive your wealth.  It also allows you to make bequests of certain items such as family heirlooms which you may wish to leave to a specific individual. For those who wish to leave funds to a charity, the Will allows you to do this.  Without a Will, this opportunity may be lost. The bottom line is that you make the call.  Dying without a Will means that the provincial government will make the determinationon how your estate is to be distributed depending on the intestacy laws. Read more

How to Keep the Family Business Thriving For Generations to Come

Most corporate dynasties fail to make it to a second generation, making these Canadian firms thriving under the leadership of the founder’s grandkids (and great-grandkids!) truly remarkable

Izzy Asper never wanted his children to work at Canwest Global Communications, the now defunct media empire he founded. His drive and hunger for acquisitions turned Canwest into one of the most powerful firms in Canada and, for a time, earned the Aspers a spot on the Rich 100. He wanted his kids to succeed elsewhere, however.

“They were all practising lawyers and were doing very nicely on their own. It was they who got this dynastic glaze in their eyes—which I generally discouraged,” he told journalist Peter C. Newman. “I don’t believe in dynasties.” But his daughter, Gail, “slipped through the net” to become general counsel at Canwest, and brothers David and Leonard followed. It was under Leonard’s stewardship that Canwest filed for bankruptcy in 2009. Read more

Why Private Wealth Management?

I am asked frequently the benefits of being in the Private Wealth Management (PWM) stream versus investing in mutual funds and/or bank funds. In order to answer this, we define PWM as the following:

  • Minimum investment $500,000
  • Custodial account (TD/National Bank/Laurentian Bank) managed by an Investment Counsellor (IC)
  • IC buys and sells securities within your account based on a rigid Investment Management Agreement (IMA) signed by you
  • A fixed fee of between 1-2% per annum is charged monthly based on the dollar amount of your account
  • The portfolio is managed according to the “discretion” of the IC, and done without your signature or acknowledgement. You give the IC the authority to trade on your behalf

Read more

ARTICLES OF INTEREST

16
Aug

Cardinal Update – August 2018

STICKING WITH THE TRIED AND TRUE REWARDS INVESTORS OVER THE LONG-RUN – After a correction early in 2018, Canadian and U.S. markets have recovered and moved higher. All is not equal across the indices though. Momentum or growth oriented stocks have been outperforming value stocks. So it is worthwhile to take a closer look at what has been doing well and how it fits with Cardinal’s investment philosophy.

Click here to read more:  Cardinal Update – August 2018

25
Jul

Cardinal Quarterly – July 2018

Market Outlook – Global stock markets jumped higher in the second quarter of 2018, moving most markets back into positive territory for the year. The UK FTSE-100 and Australian ASX-100 were the top performing markets, up 8.6% and 7.6% respectively. Other international markets were also positive with the German DAX-30 and French CAC-40 up 2.5% and 3.3% respectively. However, U.S. dollar appreciation in the 5% range offset most of these gains. In North America, the S&P TSX and the S&P 500 gained 7.0% and 5.3% respectively with the US dollar gaining slightly on the Loonie.

Click here to read more:  Cardinal Quarterly – July 2018

11
Jul

DM – Q2 Portfolio Commentary

Checking the mathOne of the most fundamental operations that students learn at business school is how to estimate the value of an asset based on the cash flow it generates. In this calculation, an appropriate current price is derived by “discounting” income streams at a given rate, often the prevailing bond yield of appropriate maturity or the return that the individual requires to commit capital to the investment. All else equal, if the asset can be acquired for less than that figure, the investor should go ahead; if not, he or she may want to look elsewhere. This method can be used to gauge fair price for income producing real estate, privately held businesses, listed stocks, and just about anything generating (or expected to generate) ongoing earnings. We can also use the technique to get a sense of where an entire equity index is trading relative both to its underlying fundamentals and how investors have valued those characteristics in the past.

Click here to read more:  DM-Portfolio-Commentary-Q2-18